EARL OF LYTTON on behalf of Victims of White Collar Crimes – comments on the Queen’s Speech

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14 06 13 Earl of LyttonThis precious text came from Len Lawrence, the air pilot poisoned by organophosphates that killed thousands of farmers. George Wescott happened to have survived and accompanied Len to a meeting of Parliamentarians where, at long last, organophosphates were on the agenda.

This excerpt regarding white collar crimes on the occasion of the Queen’s Speech dates from Hansard on 09 June 2014.

The Earl of Lytton (Crossbench)

My Lords, the gracious Speech refers to a fairer society. The Minister mentioned the Criminal Justice and Courts Bill, and rightly referred to the importance of the rule of law. However, I start with the Home Secretary’s address to the Police Federation on 21 May. She made a welcome promise of better protection for whistleblowers in the police. People such as James Patrick have put their entire careers on the line for the truth. However, the proposed new offence of police corruption is otiose. We already have laws enough on our statute books, although of course police co-operation in investigating themselves may be in doubt.

The Home Secretary suggested that leaving police operations unfettered would resist political pressures but that, to me, means inadequate oversight despite the beefing up of Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary. Operations at the front line will always trump policy. We still have many questions but few answers to the points raised about police culture and operations. A senior judge has recently questioned the objectivity of that other safeguard, the IPCC, as mentioned by the noble Baroness, Lady Smith of Basildon.

Under anti-social behaviour legislation, the police have virtually untrammelled and incontestable powers. They decide ab initio who they think is the guilty party. The rampantly one-sided exercise of these in a case involving a Sussex MP has been corroborated by cases in South Wales, Devon and Cornwall, Thames Valley and, in the most recent, from Hampshire, police evidence seems to have been total fiction. I have been shown custody records altered post hoc to refer falsely to a more serious offence of violence. I have seen manifestly concocted properties for legal photographs used to procure convictions in magistrates’ courts. This I now find is very easy to do, and applies also to CCTV and audio files. This material is increasingly used as evidence in court proceedings. All that is required is slackness by witnesses and prosecution, and the guidance of ACPO on digital evidence to be ignored, and you have a recipe for misleading the court.

I learn of serious failure of prosecution to disclose documents as required, and of failure of defence teams and judges to ensure compliance. The Attorney-General’s recent guidance identifies this as a threat to a fair trial. I hear of documents that are unsigned or undated, possibly even forged, being accepted by the courts, and a failure to safeguard the interests of people under rulings from the Court of Protection.

Much of this is ongoing, with frequent accounts of files lost, court records deleted or unavailable, police notes absent or officer amnesia in the witness box. A solicitor categorised this for me as “gaming” the provisions of Section 117 of the Criminal Justice Act 2003, because a police witness cannot be cross-examined on something he has forgotten, and if the only other evidence is documentary or electronic, however faulty, then that must stand unless the defence can have the evidence struck out: effectively a reversal of the burden of proof. It would also appear from a recent BBC “File on 4” programme that these and allied manipulation of rules of evidence and procedure continue at the highest administrative and professional levels.

Withdrawing most legal aid—a principle I applaud as a general concept—but without rendering the system of justice accessible and affordable to normal folk, as mentioned by the noble Baroness, Lady Deech, seems to be a flawed policy. I question why two legal experts are required to represent a criminal defendant. However, if undeserving types were gaming the legal aid budget beforehand, we now appear to have police and prosecution gaming the procedures to the detriment of fair trials. Add these together and we have a situation once described to my father by his lawyer as follows: “Where there is muddle and confusion, dishonesty follows close behind”. I try to remember that.

Once an offence, police notification or occasion of arrest is established, the details go into a police computer system. The citizen does not have rights, or certainly has no adequate rights, to gain access to or check that for accuracy, yet may find material regurgitated at some future date in proceedings, shared with other agencies or disclosed in a CRB check. Necessary protections before the law remain inadequate, open to abuse, and are being manipulated to the unfair disadvantage for defendants in criminal proceedings in particular. This erodes trust in a vital sector of public administration. That imperils the rule of law and ultimately, the stability of society. Oversight must be restored. Senior law officers within the Government have long been aware of the situation, so why no action?

We should not be complacent or wag our finger at other jurisdictions, while all the while corrupt practices infect our own affairs. The Government need to act now—or if not this one, now, then a new one in 2015.

MOUNTING CONCERN as more Portuguese parents lose children to British social services

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14 06 07 AlgarveThis is the story written by Natasha Donn and published by the ALGARVE Resident on 07 June 2014:

Following the desperate story of the Pedros – absolved of wrong-doing in the police case that stripped them of their children but still waiting miserably to be reunited as a family – more news has come out of UK to support allegations of a high-level forced adoption ring involving thousands of children.

Público newspaper reports this week of up to five cases where Portuguese immigrants in Britain have had their children taken from them – without charges being pressed or indeed proven. They are reported to be warned that any communication, online or to the press, could mean that they never see their children again.

John Hemming, the Liberal Democrat MP who has been fighting for Justice for Families for years, claims parents are threatened with imprisonment if they speak out – and that this would mean the loss of their parental rights.

McKenzie Friend adviser Ian Josephs also told Público that as opposed to criminal courts where people are considered innocent until proven guilty, the opposite is the case in family courts.

“There, parents are considered guilty until they can prove their innocence” – and that is if their case ever gets to the family court.

In many cases children are removed from their parents and simply not returned even if the parent is not charged.

This appears to be the case in the situation involving at least one of the Portuguese parents in the Público investigation.

The 29-year-old lost her five-month-old daughter after taking her to hospital with a bruise on her head.

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New Cross-Party Group of MPs calling for Inquiry into Child Sex Abuse

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Sabine Kurjo McNeill:

At long last!!!

Originally posted on Desiring Progress:

The pioneering news organisation Exaro have published two important articles today by David Hencke relating to a cross-party group of seven MPs who have written jointly to Home Secretary Theresa May called for a proper inquiry into child abuse, citing the Hillsborough inquiry as a model (see Hencke, ‘Police keep failing ‘to follow evidence’ in abuse cases, say MPs: Call for wide inquiry into ‘schools, churches, children’s homes, politicians and celebrities’, 3/6/14, and ‘MPs call on Theresa May to set inquiry into child sex abuse: Tim Loughton and Zac Goldsmith in cross-party group that highlights failures by police’, 3/6/14; see also Jason Beattie, ‘MPs demand inquiry into historic claims of child sex abuse by Cabinet Ministers’, Daily Mirror, 4/6/14).

The seven MPs in question (who Hencke has elsewhere called the ‘Magnificent Seven’) are:

Conservatives:
Zac Goldsmith, MP for Richmond Park, whose constituency contains

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Bad and Very Bad judges

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Sabine Kurjo McNeill:

Judges are only ‘human’???… On 25 March 2014 The Guardian asked: Who is judging the judges? on http://www.theguardian.com/law/2014/mar/25/who-judges-the-judges

Originally posted on UK Human Rights Blog:


9780854901418A recent, short (71 pages), and interesting book on the phenomenon of the bad judge, by Graeme Williams Q.C: details here.   You may not be surprised to read that, libel laws being what they are, all the subjects of Williams’ book are in their graves. But, as the author points out, the lessons derived from their badnesses live on.

A number of themes emerge.

The first is that bad judges are often clever judges, but people temperamentally ill-suited to listening patiently to other people – which is unsurprisingly a large part of their job.

The second is that some of the most disastrous appointments are truly political ones. Mercifully we now have a sophisticated system of judicial appointments which is currently divorced from the rough and tumble of politics – though with the politicisation of the office of the Lord Chancellor, and the shrilling-up of the press debate about…

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DERAILED from the Public Interest – the Public Gravy Train

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Cover of "George Orwell's 1984 (Max Notes...

Cover of George Orwell’s 1984 (Max Notes)

I have been musing for a while how to express my dismay about Child removal as a class war, as I am reading George Orwell’s 1984 who wrote in 1949 about the ‘underclass’ being expected just to be breeding and working… The public gravy train is used by all public institutions and the legal profession via ‘legal aid’.

This post in my daily email from The Tap confirms ‘from the outside’ what I’ve watched day in day out:

1. victims of child snatching are discovering what victims of fraudulent bankruptcies have observed:

  • the absence of Articles 1 and 13 in the UK Human Rights Act;
  • Article 1 means that all articles are binding and Article 13 is about the ‘remedy against national authorities’.

2. Teresa May admitted before this House of Lords Committee that ‘fraud is a difficult issue’:

  • why haven’t any of our cries have been heard and taken seriously!?
  • why don’t Early Day Motions make a difference??
  • in other words: nobody in the establishment CARES, as long as they have their salaries, pensions and who knows what perks.

3. There are far too many organisations and committees that are supposed to remedy evil, but the situation gets worse, as nobody tackles the issue of money creation at its roots: More

WILL LITHUANIA FOLLOW the precedence set by Slovakia, Portugal and Latvia?

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Sabine Kurjo McNeill:

Non-UK parents need to take the lead, it seems, in breaking the punitive and secretive culture of UK Social Services.

Originally posted on Voluntary Public Interest Advocacy:

This Lithuanian article   For drunken past – a terrible punishment for the mother – triggered this blog post:

The Slovakian Government succeeded in getting the two Boor boys returned after demos outside the UK Embassy and significant TV coverage.

A year later, the Slovak TV station produced this subtitled programme, when it learned that the precedence set by Slovakia had not made a difference in the UK:

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FOR 22 MAY ELECTIONS – petitions and hashtags: #childsnatchuk for #paedobritain

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White collar crime reservation

White collar crime reservation (Photo credit: chrisdaniel)

Institutions tend to respond “we don’t deal with individual cases“, when you dare to complain about having been victimised by white collar criminals.

But local councillors and MEPs will be re-elected on 22 May. They are voted in to care for our causes and solve the problems that ‘the system’ has created for us!

Use www.WriteToThem.com and ask your representatives:

What do we do when individual cases become official statistics?

  • Reports get compiled and published until enough people get sufficiently shocked by big enough numbers.
  • Social clout counts and online influence matters! 

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